Josh Brent Former Dallas Cowboy Convicted in Fatal DUI Crash

Posted on Jan 27, 2014

Former Dallas Cowboy player, Josh Brent, was convicted of intoxication manslaughter, according to national news. He could face up to twenty years in prison for killing his friend, Jerry Brown in a fatal drunk driver crash in December, 2012.

The Dallas Morning News said Stacey Jackson, the mother of the deceased man, has allegedly forgiven Brent for taking the life of her son. Brent’s attorneys may call Jackson as one of their witnesses when they argue for leniency during sentencing.

The two football players were close friends and teammates at the University of Illinois. Brown joined the Cowboys just a couple months before the fatal wreck. Brent drove home drunk after a night of partying. Brown was a passenger in his vehicle when he crashed on a highway in a Dallas suburb. 

Brent’s BAC level was 0.18 – more than twice the legal limit. Authorities say it would have taken as many as seventeen drinks for the DUI offender to get that intoxicated. During trial, his attorneys said the tests were “faulty” and he “could not have drank nearly that much.” According to authorities, he was driving his Mercedes at speeds up to 110 mph. In a news article, Brent’s attorney said no one is sorrier then Brent that he has lost his good friend, as well as his career.

The news reported Brent had support from several teammates who attended his trial. Cowboy’s owner, Jerry Jones, also spoke out on the team website saying, “This has just been a terrible experience for the families who lost a loved one and for Josh who loved Jerry as well.” 

According to State Prosecutors, the fatal drunk driver crash was “a textbook case of intoxication manslaughter.” They asked the jury to send a message about the dangers of drunken drivers – strongly emphasizing – “they shouldn’t be driving, no exceptions, no excuses!”

The jurors watched a video of Brent who appeared to be holding bottles of Champagne in each hand and receipts from credit cards showing he had bought three bottles. They also watched him occasionally stumbling over words while talking to officers and losing his balance during field sobriety tests.