Understanding How a Concussion Affects Short and Long Term Memory

Video Transcription:
I think it's pretty common for us to walk up to someone and maybe not remember their name or not remember something we are trying to recall, and sort of pass it off as a little bit of a memory issue. But if you've been involved in an accident and after that accident, you're having issues remembering names or places or dates or events, it can be pretty devastating if it's not going away.

Remember that we rely on our memory in terms of our ability to function in life. Scientists tell us that we have two kinds of memory. We have short term memory and long term memory. And, we actually keep things in our working memory which is our short term memory as long as we need it but after we've used it we pass it over to our long term memory, and that's where we store, manage and retrieve information that we need in our life.

So, depending on which area of the brain has been damaged, someone may have lost part or all of their short term memory or even part or all of their long term memory. Sometimes it can be a measure of both. These are serious symptoms that need to be taken seriously and not something that should be overlooked at as "oh, I'm getting older". These need to be address by a doctor, so that they can determine themselves medically whether there has been a brain injury that has caused memory loss, and so the treatment can begin and a compensatory mechanism is established in your life to sort of make up for what's going on.

So, just make sure that these are mentioned to your doctor, properly diagnosed in the event that they don't go away and get better.

Jim Dodson
A Florida injury lawyer, family man and avid cyclist who clients have trusted for over 25 years.